ANTIRACISM MEDITATION

ANTIRACISM
MEDITATION

Two friends -- one Black, one White -- teaching the world how to be anti-racist through mediation. Our unique perspectives provide a 360 lens to personal and societal healing. We invite you to join us -- tune inward, reflect, awaken and grow.
anti-racism
[noun /anˌtīˈrāˌsizəm/]
1. the continual practice of standing against racism and promoting racial inclusion
2. being mindful of systemic racism in society and the courage to stop it
3. the awareness that silence means I am part of the problem
anti-racism journal prompts
  • What are some moments when I committed microaggressions. Do I understand why these types of statements and actions are harmful and hurtful?
    i.e. Can I touch your hair? Wow you speak so well! Where is your family from?
  • What racist thoughts, words and actions have I had because of the way someone looks?
    i.e. Crossed the street. Clutched my bags. Assume someone lived in an unsafe area. Assume someone’s family is uneducated.
  • Have I ever witnessed someone make a racist joke or comment and not said anything?
    Reflect on the phrase ‘silence is violence’. Have I ever made a racist comment or joke myself?
  • Reflect on my social circle.
    Do all of my friends look like me? Do I choose experiences that expose me to other cultures, religions, sexualities and ethnicities? Do I enable and encourage my children to befriend those with different backgrounds (i.e. books with diverse children or LGBTQ people, diverse schools)?

  • Am I aware of my bias when hiring, mentoring or collaborating with others for work?
    Do I design products and solutions for all people with a focus on those most disenfranchised? Or do I hire, mentor, collaborate with and design for the default White audience?
  • Reflect on my media consumption. 
    Do I watch TV and films that portray POC in a positive way, highlight their stories, include them as protagonists. Do I read books written by POC?  
  • Based on listening to the meditation, what are some examples of privileges that I enjoy.
    Does society see me as a person of color, what is my proximity to whiteness? Although I am a POC, my culture experiences less discrimination or racism that is not life threatening. Am I seen as a model minority?
  • How does it feel to know that I have these privileges even though I did not earn them?
    What emotions do I feel? Denial, shame, guilt, interest, sadness, anger. I can use the meditation to continue to sit with these emotions. Practice self compassion.
  • What can I do with my privilege to support those who have less?
    How do I interact with family, friends, community, humanity at large? How can I educate myself, speak up when I notice racism, encourage conversation.  How can I contribute socially, financially, politically?
  • What I am willing to do and say in the fight against racism? What am I willing to surrender? What will I have to surrender?
    Risk relationships. Lose friends, end racial solidarity (i.e. white solidarity). Surrender my comfort. Surrender my complicity.
  • How will I choose to be a good ally?
    Some examples to choose from are looking to Black leaders and activists for cues. Use my privilege to engage in difficult conversations with friends and family who say racist things. Investigate and improve how Black employees are hired, mentored and promoted in my workplace. Vote. Rethink how I make new friendships. Read and share stories of Black people with children and loved ones
  • What will I avoid doing as a good ally?
     I will not ignore the concerns of Black people and other POC. I will speak up when I hear racist language or notice systemic racism. I will not ask how I can help, burden POC with my ignorance, fear, emotions, discomfort or condolences.
  • What are some moments when I committed microaggressions. Do I understand why these types of statements and actions are harmful and hurtful?
    i.e. Can I touch your hair? Wow you speak so well! Where is your family from?
  • What racist thoughts, words and actions have I had because of the way someone looks?
     i.e. Crossed the street. Clutched my bag. Assumed someone lived in an unsafe area. Assumed someone’s family is uneducated. 
  • Have I ever witnessed someone make a racist joke or comment and not said anything?
    Reflect on the phrase ‘silence is violence’. Have I ever made a racist comment or joke myself?
  • Reflect on my social circle.
    Do all of my friends look like me? Do I choose experiences that expose me to other cultures, religions, sexualities and ethnicities? Do I enable and encourage my children to befriend those with different backgrounds (i.e. books with diverse children or LGBTQ people, diverse schools)?

  • Am I aware of my bias when hiring, mentoring or collaborating with others for work?
    Do I design products and solutions for all people with a focus on those most disenfranchised? Or do I hire, mentor, collaborate with and design for the default White audience?
  • Reflect on my media consumption.
    Do I watch TV and films that portray POC in a positive way, highlight their stories, include them as protagonists. Do I read books written by POC?
  • Based on listening to the meditation, what are some examples of privileges that I enjoy.
    Does society see me as a person of color, what is my proximity to whiteness? Although I am a POC, my culture experiences less discrimination or racism that is not life threatening. Am I seen as a model minority?
  • How does it feel to know that I have these privileges even though I did not earn them?
    What emotions do I feel? Denial, shame, guilt, interest, sadness, anger. I can use the meditation to continue to sit with these emotions. Practice self compassion.
  • What can I do with my privilege to support those who have less?
    How do I interact with family, friends, community, humanity at large? How can I educate myself, speak up when I notice racism, encourage conversation.  How can I contribute socially, financially, politically?
  • What I am willing to do and say in the fight against racism? What am I willing to surrender? What will I have to surrender?
    Risk relationships. Lose friends, end racial solidarity (i.e. white solidarity). Surrender my comfort. Surrender my complicity.
  • How will I choose to be a good ally?
    Some examples to choose from are looking to Black leaders and activists for cues. Use my privilege to engage in difficult conversations with friends and family who say racist things. Investigate and improve how Black employees are hired, mentored and promoted in my workplace. Vote. Rethink how I make new friendships. Read and share stories of Black people with children and loved ones.
  • What will I avoid doing as a good ally?
    I will not ignore the concerns of Black people and other POC. I will speak up when I hear racist language or notice systemic racism. I will not ask how I can help, burden POC with my ignorance, fear, emotions, discomfort or condolences.
listen to the album

Why We Created This Project

Two friends -- one Black, one White -- teaching the world how to be anti-racist through meditation. Our unique perspectives provide a 360 lens to personal and societal healing. We invite you to join us -- tune inward, reflect, awaken and grow.
“During the course of my life, I have developed close relationships with people who at some point revealed themselves to be racist. This led me to realize that no matter how kind, caring and loving someone may be, it’s still possible for them to be blinded by ignorance. This blindness leads to hurtful language and action and to unknowing contribution to systemic racism.

We are at a critical moment where people are ready to wake up and to support each other. There are so many articles that explain what to read and how to be a good ally. But racist ideologies are so deeply ingrained in American culture that awakening is a difficult process. Doing the hard work to realize one’s own racism and to sit with that shame is very difficult. Remaining in that shame can be paralyzing and prevent action. This is a time for action, not for paralysis. We made this album for all of the people who are opening their hearts, who care so deeply about our safety and are digging deep to learn and take action.”

- Iman
“I was born and raised in Los Angeles, but a few years ago I moved to a small town in GA. It was eye opening to go from a ‘liberal’ metropolis to a rural, primarily Black community still largely segregated by train tracks with White neighbors who proudly display confederate flags on their lawns. But on multiple occasions, I was too uncomfortable to speak up when hearing racial slurs used casually in conversation. I justified my silence as shyness and fear of confrontation. Reflecting on these overt experiences made me realize that there is racism even in seemingly liberal spaces."


I have close relationships with Black people, like Iman, who have to endure the realities of racism daily. Being White, I will never understand that kind of oppression. I even have the privilege to choose to ignore it, but that is selfish, unjust and racist. If I want to be anti-racist, I have a duty to act.”

- Tori
“During the course of my life, I have developed close relationships with people who at some point revealed themselves to be racist. This led me to realize that no matter how kind, caring and loving someone may be, it’s still possible for them to be blinded by ignorance. This blindness leads to hurtful language and action and to unknowing contribution to systemic racism.

We are at a critical moment where people are ready to wake up and to support each other. There are so many articles that explain what to read and how to be a good ally. But racist ideologies are so deeply ingrained in American culture that awakening is a difficult process. Doing the hard work to realize one’s own racism and to sit with that shame is very difficult. Remaining in that shame can be paralyzing and prevent action. This is a time for action, not for paralysis. We made this album for all of the people who are opening their hearts, who care so deeply about our safety and are digging deep to learn and take action.”

- Iman
“I was born and raised in Los Angeles, but a few years ago I moved to a small town in GA. It was eye opening to go from a ‘liberal’ metropolis to a rural, primarily Black community still largely segregated by train tracks with White neighbors who proudly display confederate flags on their lawns. But on multiple occasions, I was too uncomfortable to speak up when hearing racial slurs used casually in conversation. I justified my silence as shyness and fear of confrontation. Reflecting on these overt experiences made me realize that there is racism even in seemingly liberal spaces."


I have close relationships with Black people, like Iman, who have to endure the realities of racism daily. Being White, I will never understand that kind of oppression. I even have the privilege to choose to ignore it, but that is selfish, unjust and racist. If I want to be anti-racist, I have a duty to act.”

- Tori

Why We Created This Project

“During the course of my life, I have developed close relationships with people who at some point revealed themselves to be racist. This led me to realize that no matter how kind, caring and loving someone may be, it’s still possible for them to be blinded by ignorance. This blindness leads to hurtful language and action and to unknowing contribution to systemic racism. We are at a critical moment where people are ready to wake up and to support each other. There are so many articles that explain what to read and how to be a good ally. But racist ideologies are so deeply ingrained in American culture that awakening is a difficult process. Doing the hard work to realize one’s own internalized racism and to sit with that shame is very difficult. Remaining in that shame can be paralyzing and prevent action.  This is a time for action, not for paralysis.  We made this album for all of the people who are opening their hearts, who care so deeply about our safety and are digging deep to learn and take action.” - Iman

“I was born and raised in Los Angeles, but a few years ago I moved to a small town in GA. It was eye opening to go from a liberal metropolis to a rural, primarily Black community, still largely segregated by train tracks, with white neighbors who proudly display confederate flags on their lawns. Because of my progressive upbringing, I assumed I was a good ally, but on multiple occasions I was too uncomfortable to speak out after hearing the N word used casually in conversation. I justified my silence as shyness and fear of confrontation, but later that morphed into guilt because I was complicit.
I have close relationships with Black people, like Iman, who have to endure the realities of racism daily. Being White, I will never understand that kind of oppression. I even have the privilege to choose to ignore it, but that is selfish, unjust and racist. If I want to be anti-racist, I have a duty to act.” - Tori

Tori Lund Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.
Iman Gibson Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.
who we are
Iman Gibson is a health educator, wellness evangelist and meditation teacher with over a decade of experience inspiring and enabling people to be mindful, eat nutritiously, and to maintain healthy habits. She began her wellbeing journey in middle school practicing yoga and meditation with Tori. Iman now designs experiences that engage the senses to promote self and community care, often utilizing art. She also daylights in product and wellbeing for a Fortune100 company.

Iman holds a BS in Public Health from the University of Southern California and a MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern. Re:Fresh, her album of meditations, guided over music, is streaming on Spotify, Apple Music and all major platforms.
Tori Lund is a yoga teacher, wellness practitioner, musician, and singer-songwriter with decades of experiences using music and yoga to inspire and heal. After being diagnosed with scoliosis in middle school --  she began practicing Hatha Yoga to alleviate pain and connected with her classmate, Iman, who was also interested in yoga. Tori went on to earn her first teaching certification at the Himalaya Yoga Valley Center in India and has since gone on to study Ayurveda, mindfulness meditation and Ashtanga and Iyengar yoga.

Tori holds a M.M. in Vocal Performance from San Diego State University and is the co-founder of the country/roots band, Few Miles South, who have released 3 studio albums and tour nationally. She currently lives in rural GA with her boyfriend and 2 dogs, Tater and Tot.
We look forward to hearing from you :)
Gulp! What was that?
Tori Lund is a yoga teacher, wellness practitioner, musician, and singer-songwriter with decades of experiences using music and yoga to inspire and heal. After being diagnosed with scoliosis in middle school --  she began practicing Hatha Yoga to alleviate pain and connected with her classmate, Iman, who was also interested in yoga. Tori went on to earn her first teaching certification at the Himalaya Yoga Valley Center in India and has since gone on to study Ayurveda, mindfulness meditation and Ashtanga and Iyengar yoga.

Tori holds a M.M. in Vocal Performance from San Diego State University and is the co-founder of the country/roots band, Few Miles South, who have released 3 studio albums and tour nationally. She currently lives in rural GA with her boyfriend and 2 dogs, Tater and Tot.
Iman Gibson is a health educator, wellness evangelist and meditation teacher with over a decade of experience inspiring and enabling people to be mindful, eat nutritiously, and to maintain healthy habits. She began her wellbeing journey in middle school practicing yoga and meditation with Tori. Iman now designs experiences that engage the senses to promote self and community care, often utilizing art. She also daylights in product and wellbeing for a Fortune100 company.

Iman holds a BS in Public Health from the University of Southern California and a MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern. Re:Fresh, her album of meditations, guided over music, is streaming on Spotify, Apple Music and all major platforms.